Thirteen days groupthink

Watch the film with the group decision-making context in mind and reflect on this context as you answer your questions.

Thirteen days groupthink

Maybe it was a business or academic committee, a social group, a church board, a government agency. Did you speak up? Or did you keep your concerns to yourself? Do you ever wish you had voiced your reservations more strongly?

Perhaps you can identify with John F. Forty years after his tragic death, President Kennedy continues to fascinate the public. Analysts dissect his political and oratorical skills, his character and legacy. The youthful president has engendered both inspiration and disappointment.

Major initiatives that he sponsored or influenced touch society today: Some brought great successes. Others were serious failures. This article looks at two specific examples: Yale social psychologist Irving Janis studied these episodes carefully and concluded that too often decision makers are blinded by their own needs for self-esteem they get from being an accepted member of a socially important insiders group.

After that huge blunder, JFK revamped his decision-making process to encourage dissent and critical evaluation among his team. In the Cuban missile crisis, virtually the same policymakers produced superior results. This article will consider how groupthink might have affected JFK and a major television enterprise, and how it can affect you.

Kennedy asked that after the Bay of Pigs fiasco. After lengthy consideration among his top advisors, Kennedy approved a covert invasion. Advance press reports alerted Castro to the threat. Lacking air support, necessary ammunition and an escape route, nearly 1, surrendered.

Top CIA leaders blamed Kennedy for not authorizing vital air strikes. Planners assumed the invaders could simply fade into the mountains for guerilla operations.

Trouble was, eighty miles of swampland separated the bay from the mountains.

Professionalism/Irving Janis and Groupthink - Wikibooks, open books for an open world His older brothers were Harvey Hollister Bundy, Jr. The Bundys met and befriended Colonel Henry L.

The list goes on. Presidential advisor Arthur Schlesinger, for instance, presented serious objections to the invasion in a memorandum to the president, but suppressed his doubts at the team meetings.

At one crucial meeting, JFK called on each member for his vote for or against the invasion.May 13,  · A short clip from a great moving about teamwork, leadership, decision-making and negotiation.

This clips shows how a courageous dissenter can slow a group down from making a dangerous decision. “Groupthink” was the term Janis used for the phenomenon of flawed group dynamics that can let bad ideas go unchallenged and can sometimes yield disastrous outcomes.

This article will consider how groupthink might have affected JFK and a major television enterprise, and how it can affect you.

Thirteen days groupthink

Political Science Exam 2 Study Guide. STUDY. PLAY. What event was portrayed in Thirteen Days? What dynamic in the movie reflected theories and ideas we discussed in class?

Cuban Missile Crisis I believe that the Iraq War is the result of the combination of intelligence failures and groupthink within the Bush Administration. Recognize groupthink when it first begins Minimize status differences Seek information that challenges emerging concurrence Develop norms that legitimizes disagreement “Being There” VIDEO CASE STUDY “Thirteen Days” – Scene 1 VIDEO CASE STUDY “Thirteen Days” – Scene 2 VIDEO CASE STUDY “Thirteen Days” – Scene 3 VIDEO CASE STUDY.

In the film Thirteen Days, McGeorge Bundy is portrayed by Frank Wood. In the HBO film Path to War, Bundy is portrayed by Cliff DeYoung. In the TV film, Killing Kennedy, Bundy was portrayed by Ray Nedzel. “Groupthink” was the term Janis used for the phenomenon of flawed group dynamics that can let bad ideas go unchallenged and can sometimes yield disastrous outcomes.

This article will consider how groupthink might have affected JFK and a major television enterprise, and how it can affect you. Robert Kennedy, Thirteen Days: A Memoir.

JFK and Groupthink: Lessons in Decision Making